Thanks for showing interest in Evans Coppice. Please contact us by which ever method suits – or just have a look at the FAQ section below. 

Alternatively please have a look around our website to see about the history of the site, the plan we have in place and what is happening. 

Current Wood Availability
This is an indication of how much wood we have ready to burn. 63%

Yes – we aim to have all our wood below 20% moisture content – this way the logs burn well and give plenty of heat output. 

We season our logs the traditional way – first they are left as long logs – usually about 4 foot long – this is known as ‘cord wood’. After a while this cord wood is cut to the final length and if necessary split to a usable size. This splitting before final seasoning is important as it speeds up the drying process – the bark stops the wood drying out so well.  This wood is then stacked outside during the summer months – normally not covered because the wetting and drying from rain actually helps to season the wood. Finally the wood is dry stored ready for final bagging for delivery.

Logs burn well when the moisture content is below 20% – regardless as to how they were dried – kiln drying or traditional seasoning.  Don’t confuse proper seasoning with logs left outside for a while – a log left as long lengths with the bark on takes years to dry.  See the section above to see how we do ours. 

Our view is that Kiln drying is for the convenience of the producer –  if you are producing 10,000 tonnes a year you simply would not have space to season them properly. The great thing about using wood to heat your home instead of fossil fuels is that it can be virtually carbon neutral – provided that the trees are replanted or allowed to re-grow as with coppiced wood.  Kiln drying uses energy (often fossil fuels) which reduces this advantage and adds cost.

Normally we deliver to an area about 5 miles from Newent, Gorsley and Upleadon – this is because to deliver further then undermines the carbon neutral benefits of wood and as we only have limited supplies of wood.

If you have a large requirement for sustainable wood and live outside this area please get in touch with us as we may be able to work something out. 

We use a convenient sack barrow sized bag – it is ventilated allowing it to have wood stored in it for a short while and is very easy to deliver to your wood store (there are exceptions!). It has a cover to keep the rain out so we can deliver our nice dry wood even when it is raining.  

We tried very hard not to use any plastic but it simply was not possible. The next best thing is to make sure our bags are looked after and used many times so we try to get them back straight away – you can keep them for a few days if necessary but we ask you to pay £5 deposit per bag.  

There are approximately 2.5 of our bags to a conventional large bulk bag but so much  more convenient!!

We charge £25 per bag plus £5 delivery for 1 or 2 bags, delivery is free after that. If you buy 5 bags you get the 6th free.

We tried very hard not to use any plastic but it simply was not possible. The next best thing is to make sure our bags are looked after and used many times so we try to get them back straight away – you can keep them for a few days if necessary but we ask you to pay £5 deposit per bag.  

There are approximately 2.5 of our bags to a conventional large bulk bag but so much  more convenient!!

We are flexible how you pay and order our logs. You can pay by cash on delivery or we have a Squareup card reader. You can order on-line and pay then.

Finally you can pay directly into our bank account using the Starling Bank ‘settle up’ facility settleup.starlingbank.com and pay there securely. 

 

The wood we supply comes from a coppice in Upleadon which contains a mix of small leaved lime, oak, wild cherry, Aspen and silver birch, so you will get a mix of these. 

It is important to remember that the heat produced per kilo of wood is the same regardless of the type – provided that the moisture content is the same. The way in which each type burns will be different though – oak needs a hot fire with quite a bit of  draught to burn well, aspen was used for making matches so it burns slowly but easily, for example.  Having a mix of lighter and heavier woods generally makes a good fire and allows you to control the fire better.